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The Madison Record

Madison students can receive flu mist; free to uninsured

Students in Madison City Schools can receive flu mist on Jan. 14 with the district’s “Teach Flu a Lesson” campaign.

Parents should complete insurance details on consent forms sent home with students last week. Forms also are available on each school’s website. Deadline for returning consent forms is Jan. 11.

“But if someone turns in a completed form on Jan. 14, we won’t turn them away,” Bonnie Davis said. A registered nurse, Davis serves as the district’s nursing supervisor.

“No out-of-pocket costs are involved for any student with Blue Cross and Blue Shield, ALLKIDs, other private insurance or Medicaid,” David said. The only exceptions are students covered only by Public Education Employees’ Health Insurance Plan (PEEHIP).

FluMist is free to students who do not have insurance.

Pre-schoolers in the district’s program at Rainbow and Mill Creek elementary schools only can receive FluMist. Children already vaccinated or who received mist do not need another vaccine. Students who have had a confirmed case of flu can receive FluMist.

“Schools will be divided into two teams. Each team will arrive at the first school at 7:45 a.m. and start at 8 a.m.,” Davis said. After students receive FluMist, the team proceeds to the next school.

Team A nurses will visit Liberty, Heritage, James Clemens, Mill Creek, Madison and Horizon schools. Team B will visit West Madison, Columbia, Rainbow, Discovery and Bob Jones.

Family Clinic of Union Springs is providing flu vaccinations and filing insurance. “A legislative act was passed this summer making clinics available to schools,” Davis. After discussion with Superintendent Dr. Dee Fowler, Davis contacted this company.

“Vaccine includes all four strains of influenza (2 A and 2 B). Strain A is causing the bad outbreak currently in the United States,” Davis said.

Davis re-emphasized that flu vaccine does NOT cause flu. Most recipients have no side effects. Some experience runny nose, nasal congestion or cough, headache and muscle aches or low-grade fever.

“If we can help prevent our students from missing school due to illness, we want to do whatever we can to help,” Davis said.

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