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The Madison Record

Get the blood pumping to fight blood cancers

Mallory Chandler, a leukemia survivor of eleven years, recalled how her life was entirely changed when she found out she had a blood cancer and how the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society played a part in her recovery.

Chandler was a sophomore in high school when she started developing headaches that would cause her to black out from the pain.

Chandler said her doctor’s first thought she had vertigo and a sinus infection.

Chandler said the next day she went back to the doctor who sent her to a Birmingham hospital to have blood work completed.

Chandler said the doctor told her she had leukemia on September 22, 2000.

Chandler said she remembers her mom always writing down their car mileage and other information for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society when they went to the hospital so they could receive financial assistance.

Chandler said that she is happy that LLS is available for patients.

Chandler said she had raised $15,000 in five events for LLS.

“The money raised in events for LLS goes to patients who need it,” Chandler said.

Executive Director of the Alabama/Gulf Coast Chapter Noralyn Hamilton said that LLS is the world’s largest voluntary health organization dedicated to funding blood cancer research, education and patient services.

The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Light the Night Walk is a fundraiser that raises money for cancer research, patient services and community outreach programs.

Last year, the LLS’s Light the Night Walk raised over $60,000.

“We had a great turnout,” said Campaign Coordinator for Light the Night Shelley Scott.  “It was a great walk.”

The walk is open to survivors, families, corporations and people of all ages.

“The walk is a way to honor people touched by these illnesses,” said Light the Night Corporate Walk Chair and Lymphoma survivor Noel Estopinal M.D.

The Light the Night walk will be held on October 20 at Bridge Street.

“Our goal for the Huntsville Light the Night walk is to increase awareness throughout the Huntsville community,” Scott said. “We have set a goal of $85,000 for this year.”

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