• 72°
The Madison Record

Jump, Williams and Colquett earn Bronze Award in Girl Scouts

MADISON – Fifth-graders Leah Jump, Maribeth Williams and Brooklyn Colquett at Columbia Elementary School completed a service project on campus to earn the Bronze Award in Girl Scouts.

Leah, Maribeth and Brooklyn designed and installed a hopscotch game on Columbia’s playground.

Girl Scouts USA introduced the Bronze Award in 2001. Scouts at the Junior level only can earn the honor.

By achieving the Bronze Award, Girl Scouts can collaborate to make a difference in their community, understand the concepts of leadership, reach out to new hobbies or interests for them and realize that small improvements for a community can make a big difference.

Leah decided to become a Scout six years ago when she was in kindergarten. Leah joined the organization so she could help other people. “My troop leaders motivated me (to achieve the Bronze Award) to help our school,” Leah said. “Students will have more things to play with” because of the hopscotch area.

Maribeth Williams, 11, has learned lots of lessons and new ideas since joining Girl Scouts in second grade.

Ten-year-old Brooklyn joined Girl Scouts when she was eight years old and has learned “you can encourage things for other people in our community.”

Brooklyn was interested in the Bronze Award “because I thought it would be very fun. What motivated me was thinking about how happy other kids will be.” Maribeth was interested in the art design for the project.

The girls received permission for their project from Columbia administrators. The Scouts’ supplies included stencils, paper and pencils, paint and brushes for the pavers. They needed shovels to slightly bury the pavers in Columbia’s playground. Their hopscotch project “will benefit kids by making them happy,” Brooklyn said.

Brooklyn’s parents are Tony and Tiffany Colquett. He works at Torch Technologies, and Tiffany works at The Surgery Center.

Maribeth’s parents are Chris Williams, who works for Arby’s, and Summer Williams, an employee at Central Office of Madison City Schools.

Leah’s father is Andrew Jump, who works at QTEC, and her mother Karen Jump works at Columbia elementary. Leah is proud that Columbia was ranked as number four among Alabama’s 718 elementary schools (according to NICHE, a national education research group).

Bob Jones High School

Nominations open for Bob Jones Hall of Fame

Madison

Nichols reminds families on COVID-19 procedures

Harvest

Partnership giving away Fentanyl test strips

Madison

Sheriff: Man flees from Limestone deputies in stolen ambulance, stolen fire truck

Madison

Triana, Madison libraries offer Makerspace for hi-tech crafts and more

Harvest

Art Tour of Homes expands into Madison with Estes and Overcash houses

Bob Jones High School

Neha, Puja Chopade’s research with Harvard mentors published in journal

Madison

Wroblewski in 15-mile swimming challenge for Wounded Warriors

Huntsville

Huntsville Ballet Company announces new season

Digital Version

Check out the August 2022 issue of Madison Living

Madison

Madison teen charged with murder after allegedly shooting brother

Bob Jones High School

Madison Area Lions’ donations help school nurses

Madison

Trash Pandas hang on, beat Lookouts 3-2 in finale

Madison

NewsNation network lauds Rodney Smith’s free lawn care

Madison

UPDATE: Madison man accused of killing former girlfriend

News

RD3 Legacy 3-On-3 Basketball Tournament Set For August 13

Madison

Trash Pandas bounce back against Lookouts with 5-2 victory

Bob Jones High School

Beautification board issues awards for well-kept sites

Madison

Auburn alum Sonny DiChiara joins Trash Pandas

Madison

MPD: Family dispute leads to shooting in Madison

Business

Former Huntsville business executive charged with wire fraud

Madison

Man charged with ex-girlfriend’s murder in Madison area

Huntsville

HPD makes drug bust in traffic stop

Huntsville

City of Huntsville mourns loss of Huntsville Fire & Rescue cadet

x