• 59°

Citizens learn crime prevention tips, tools

Crime in Madison has decreased for two consecutive years.

 

Lt. John Stringer, Madison Police Department

That was good, yet surprising, news that residents heard from Lt. John Stringer, who conducted a crime prevention session at City Hall on June 30.

Surrounding communities have seen a serious spike in crime lately, and thieves entered 25 cars in Madison during a weekend spree.

However, Stringer explained statistics covering January to June in 2010, 2011 and 2012 for residential burglaries, which include garage and house attachments. In 2010, Madison had 117 burglaries, which decreased to 101 in 2011 and yet another drop to 86 in 2012.

Breaking and entering of automobiles accounted for 165 incidents in 2010, 86 in 2011 and 79 this year. “In criminal mischief, which includes vandalism, graffiti, keying cars and practical jokes, in January through June in 2010, we had 47 incidents, 37 in 2011 and 39 in 2012. So, this has been consistent over three years,” Stringer said.

Stringer credited the “Protecting Our Communities” initiative as one factor. Madison officers “park and talk” with individuals in compiling reports. “We get more tips that way. Citizen involvement also reduced the numbers. A small tip can break a major case,” he said.

Throughout the session, Stringer offered common sense tips for crime prevention and using new technology. He recommended Nixle.com, a free online service that quickly posts police department messages to cell phones and email. “You type 35758 for Madison’s zip code or 35801 for Huntsville to receive Nixle messages,” he said.

The audience asked questions about Neighborhood Watch groups, which Stringer strongly supports. “Citizens are a force multiplier,” he said.

“The bad guys are not stupid,” Stringer said. He described a “drug lord” that he helped to arrest as “one of the most charismatic, intelligent and manipulative people” he had ever met.

Stringer is a 17-year veteran in law enforcement. He works as community resource officer and in field training, narcotics investigations and martial arts instruction. “Citizens deserve the best that we can do. It’s part of the Madison police culture,” he said.

To contact Madison Police Department, call 256-722-7190.

Madison

Heritage’s Chander, Nuzman, Gowder and Rajput shine at state science fair

Madison

Professional baseball returns to North Alabama, Trash Pandas fall 4-3 in home opener

Professional baseball returns to North Alabama, Trash Pandas fall 4-3 in home opener

Bob Jones High School

Joshua Lin, Nikhita Mudium named U.S. Presidential Scholars

Madison

Trash Pandas play home opener Tonight

Madison

Rocket City defeated 7-1 in Chattanooga

Business

Trash Pandas Underway

Harvest

Sergeant Major Bobby Lee completed several deployments to Middle East

Madison

Wild comeback leads Trash Pandas to first win

Madison

Emergency Water Outage – Highland Drive

Harvest

Moore performs in ‘Tinker Bell,’ works with models and Sparkman photographers

Madison

School board expected to vote on elementary rezoning plan tonight

Madison

Trash Pandas drop inaugural game 6-1 in Chattanooga

James Clemens High School

Chase Lynn’s work on Heritage Church campus secures his Eagle rank

Madison

Madison County Sheriff’s Office charges man for making school threats

Digital Version

Digital version of The Madison Record – May 5, 2021

Madison

New traffic signal at County Line Road and Old Highway 20 set for activation

Bob Jones High School

Bob Jones students gain perspective, win awards at HOSA conference

Madison

Trash Pandas season opener rained out

James Clemens High School

Gohlich restores refuge nature trail to earn Eagle rank in Boy Scouts

Bob Jones High School

Legere, Lott, Prater and Sullivan rank academically in Calhoun’s Top Ten

Madison

Madison City Schools hit with cybersecurity threat

Madison

Student families take a moment to thank teachers this week

Madison

American Legion hosts 2 baseball activities for youth

Madison

Madison woman dies in Limestone wreck

x