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Wortham attends Peacebuilders Camp

Joshua Wortham, in front, flashes a peace sign as he stands with his counselors at Peacebuilders Camp at Koinonia Farm in Americus, Ga. (CONTRIBUTED)
Joshua Wortham, in front, flashes a peace sign as he stands with his counselors at Peacebuilders Camp at Koinonia Farm in Americus, Ga. (CONTRIBUTED)

MADISON – Eleven-year-old Joshua Wortham studied with young people from across the Southeast at Peacebuilders Camp at Koinonia Farm in Americus, Ga.

“In the midst of national and international news about police brutality, shootings, debt crises, drone warfare and unrest in the Middle East, Peacebuilders Camp is training the leaders of tomorrow,” co-founder Jonah McDonald said.

Campers from 11 to 14 years old were introduced to individuals and groups across Georgia who are working to confirm human rights are accessible to everyone. “These young people ask how they can make the world a better place,” McDonald said. “Peacebuilders Camp helps them discover answers.”

Joshua’s parents are William and Rebecca Wortham. “Joshua worked so hard with his Peaceful Pastries and Sweets business to raise the camp tuition,” Rebecca said. “He had such an awesome time at camp and can’t wait to go back next year.”

At camp on July 13-18, Joshua became close friends with two boys from Thailand. He learned about fair trade and the Peace Corps, along with visiting Cafe Campesino coffee roastery and Georgia Southwestern State University for exposure to the arts and to science.

Located in rural southern Georgia, Peacebuilders Camp assembles a diverse group of youth to enjoy farm life, play games and sports, go on field trips and explore stories of peacemakers past and present.

Founded in 1942, Koinonia Farm residents committed to treat all humans with dignity and justice. Black and white farmers were paid equally, and everyone was invited to sit at the table, regardless of color, McDonald said.

“Koinonia remained a witness to nonviolence and racial equality as its members withstood firebombs, bullets, KKK rallies and death threats,” McDonald said. “But Koinonia survived. In later years, Koinonia became the birthplace of Habitat for Humanity International.”

For more information, call McDonald at 404-373-8036, email to jonah@peacebuilderscamp.org or visit peacebuilderscamp.org.

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