• 54°

Bob Jones students consider censorship during Banned Books Week

Media specialist Cindy Huskey believes she is doing her job if a book in the library offends every person who walks through the doors.

Huskey and fellow media specialist Shane Jones at Bob Jones High School led observance of Banned Books Week on Sept. 30 through Oct. 5.

Each day, Huskey tweeted a trivia question about banned books and gave a prize for the first correct answer. Oct. 1 was “I Eat Banned Books for Breakfast” day with classes voting for their favorite banned book.

On “Virtual Read” day, students created videos showing a person reading a banned book. Bob Jones students also recorded videos stylized like “Saturday Night Live” skits about censoring books.

Huskey follows two points from the Madison Board of Education about adding titles to library shelves:

* Materials support and are consistent with general educational goals of the district, school and curriculum.

* Materials are appropriate for subject area, age, emotional and social development and ability of students.

Banned Books Week originated in 1982 when the Island Trees Board of Education in Levittown, N.Y. voted to ban several books, including Kurt Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse Five.” Seventeen-year-old Steven Pico challenged the board’s decision. The case advanced to the Supreme Court, which ruled 5-4 in favor of Pico.

That same year, Banned Books Week was launched in response to a surge in the number of banned and challenged books, Huskey said.

During Banned Books Week, several students asked Huskey if she would ever ban a book. “My job is not to decide what is right or wrong. My role is to provide information to everyone, regardless of the point of view or ideology an author espouses,” Huskey said.

“Would you put ’50 Shades of Grey’ in the library?” another person asked.

“No, I wouldn’t for two reasons: the book is neither consistent with our educational goals nor appropriate for the emotional, social or educational development of our student body. The book is classified as erotica and, therefore, has no place in our collection,” Huskey said.

Madison

Mill Creek Greenpower Team motors to first place in Oxford

James Clemens High School

James Clemens Competition Cheer Team takes fourth state title

Madison

The celebration continues: Madison Street Festival awards grants to 16 Madison educational programs

Events

The Loomis Brothers Circus returns this weekend

James Clemens High School

Wyche earns full-tuition scholarship from Cameron Education Foundation

Madison

ReadyFest returns to underscore need for preparedness

Madison

Winter Knights Chess Tournament sets record attendance

Harvest

Delta Sigma Theta plans exciting evening with ROUGE – A Go Red Event

Events

Burritt on the Mountain to host Shane Adkins for Coffeehouse Concert series

Bob Jones High School

Sponsors essential to achieving Madison Street Festival’s traditions

Madison

Registration opens to vie for seat in pre-kindergarten

Huntsville

Former doctor from Madison sued for overdose death

James Clemens High School

Donaldson piloting James Clemens as Acting Principal

Madison

Discovery of woman’s body in Hazel Green leads to investigation of possible murder-suicide

Huntsville

Rookie Rally Chess Tournament returns to Blossomwood

Huntsville

Arts Huntsville awards $280,000 in grants to area arts organizations

Bob Jones High School

Nichols’ podcast reflects on MCS’ 25th anniversary

Madison

Regions Bank on Madison Blvd robbed again

Madison

JAN. 20 DEADLINE: Madison Visionary Partners asking for nominations for first annual MVP awards

Madison

Damaging winds, flooding possible tonight

Madison

Community remembers Donald Spencer’s public service

Madison

Water main break postpones Bob Jones vs. Austin basketball games

Madison

Library sessions to offer backyard planting tips to novice gardeners

Madison

Editorial: King’s words speak to all

x