• 59°
The Madison Record

Water rates rising in the city?

When residents in the city turn on their faucets in October, it could be costing them a bit more.

Madison Utilities General Manager Ricky Pounders unveiled the 2011 proposed budget during a work session Aug. 31, and the budget calls for a water rate increase to meet the needs of the department.

The proposed water rate increase will go from $16.70 to $18.70, based on 5,000 gallons usage, with sewer rates rising from $3 to $5 and wastewater rates rising from $22.35 to $25.10.

On average, the rate increase will be approximately $5 per household.

The budget will be presented at the next board meeting Sept. 20, and the rate increase will go into effect, if passed, Oct. 1.

Pounders said the department hasn’t raised rates since 2006, and revenues have dwindled since the drought of 2007.

In addition, Pounders said the falling revenues have delayed work on several capital projects.

“We have basically postponed and tabled critical projects we need to get moving on,” Pounders said. “This will allow us to start moving in that direction.”

The department has also begun testing the water quality at the rock quarry, which could provide 1 million gallons for the city if it passes inspection.

However, since the drought, Pounders said more and more people are conserving water, which could delay the need for a plant at the river for several more years.

“If you could rewind to 2007, people started conserving water because of the drought, and those people have kept those same habits, which is not bad at all.” Pounders said. “It’s not all bad news.”

The 2011 budget projects $12 million in expenses, with $12,117,334 in revenues with the new increase.

The new budget also eliminates discounts for the city and the city school system.

Despite the projected increase, another rate hike could be in the works if the revenues do not meet the department’s needs.

Madison

Have a fun scare at library’s Mad Movie-A-Thon-O-Rama!

Madison

Space Week takes Horizon students on aerospace, tech discoveries

Madison

City urges caution as paving progresses on Hughes Road

Bob Jones High School

Madison City Chess League forms new group for adults

Madison

Madison City Schools named best Alabama school district

Madison

Mercy Wolverton impressively masters hi-tech study, business

Madison

At Madison Street Festival, veterans to show fighter helicopter from Vietnam War

Madison

Local marching bands to be featured at “March on Madison” tonight

Madison

MSF’s Community Showcase promises array of talent

Madison

Brooms, mops in Lions Club sale to raise funds for vision projects

Harvest

Local musicians to jam at Madison Street Festival

Madison

Trash Pandas fall 4-2, Tennessee evens series

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Athletic Hall Of Fame Accepting Nominations

Harvest

Railyard BBQ Brawl and Music Festival returns Oct. 29

Bob Jones High School

Tommy Overcash appointed to Madison Board of Education

Madison

Children vulnerable for troubled mental health, Cook says

Madison

Fast start leads Trash Pandas to 9-5 in playoff game 1 win

Harvest

Updating state’s 1901 Constitution on November ballot

James Clemens High School

Boynton champions languages with ‘A Seal of Biliteracy’

Madison

Jessica Penot to discuss ‘Haunted North Alabama’

Madison

MSF shows artistic influences at Artist Alley, Crafters Cove and Student Art Tent

Bob Jones High School

Bob Jones, James Clemens command National Merit totals for Alabama

Bob Jones High School

Coaches White and McGehee speak in ‘Sittin’ With the Supe’

Huntsville

Dr. Charles L. Karr named President of UAH

x