• 57°

All things Scottish: Annual event draws crowds for athletic events, shopping

By By Mitch Freeman Madison County Record
The recent Scottish Festival at Madison's Dublin Park attracted strong guys that threw around tree trunks, musicians that played bagpipes and some good cooks that sold their goodies. People came from all around to enjoy the festivities.
There were booths that sold all kinds of swords and daggers, booths to help you search for your family roots and many booths that represented a Scottish family name.
W.K. Cummings came from Macon, Ga. to preside over the Scottish heavy events, including the hammer toss. Cummings said the average toss is around 80 feet, but there are guys that toss the hammer well over 100 feet. The hammer is a 22-pound chunk of steel with a three-foot handle attached.
Another event was throwing the "stone of strength" or "clacknock," which is like throwing the shot put, but in this case, it is a 15-pound stone. Cummings said the average throw is about 33 feet.
The caber toss is one of the other so-called heavy athletic events. Competitors pick up an 18 to 20-foot tree trunk, minus tree limbs, and toss it end-over-end.
The idea is to make the caber land in a 12 o'clock, straight-line position from where it was thrown. According to Cummings, the tree toss competition began when King Alfred of Scotland used it to train clan chiefs, bodyguards and mercenaries.
Local talent participating in the festival included Richard VanValkenburg of Huntsville, who played his guitar and sang Scottish songs, complete with a Scottish accent.
A group of musicians who call themselves the Food Fortune Ceilidh Band played Celtic tunes with guitars, a Celtic harp, uillean pipes, high and low penny flutes, a bodhran drum and fiddles. Cindy Stiene and Larry Hogan of Madison play in the group.
John Dall, served as the master of ceremonies for the festival, something he does almost every weekend. Dall, an industrial engineer, lives in Waynesville, N.C. He moved to the U.S. in 1950 from Lady Bank, Kingdom of Fife, Scotland.
His thick Scottish accent still prevails when he speaks.

Madison

Madison Fire & Rescue responds to second baby surrender through Safe Haven Baby Box

Bob Jones High School

Robertson finds ‘perfect fit’ as Special Education Coordinator

Liberty Middle School

Liberty’s Mardi Paws Parade raises funds for shelter animals

James Clemens High School

11-day tour to Korea, Japan in summer 2025 open to Madison teens

James Clemens High School

Players eager for 2024 Grade-Level City Chess Championship

Harvest

‘Brews for Enable’ at Yellowhammer to benefit Enable Madison County

Bob Jones High School

MCCL members, teams grab awards at Rookie Rally

Madison

State board lauds Heritage in ‘Top 25 Percent Schools’ for Alabama

Harvest

Parker composes, performs and mentors songwriters in lifetime of music

Bob Jones High School

Bob Jones AFJROTC named Grand Champions at Hoover

Bob Jones High School

TVA’s School Uplift grants can reduce energy costs and improve campus

Bob Jones High School

Warm-up Quads on Feb. 24 to prepare players for City Chess Championship

Liberty Middle School

Chander, Grieve, Rajput win national awards in PTA Reflections

Bob Jones High School

Knights of Columbus’ donations buy pods for MCS Special Education

Madison

Love is alive and well in the heart of this special artist

Digital Version

Digital version of The Madison Record – Feb. 14, 2024

Bob Jones High School

Bob Jones, JC girls gear up for region play today at Wallace State

Business

Billboard selects Orion Amphitheater as “Top East Coast Amphitheater”

Madison

School choice: Is there really choice?

Bob Jones High School

Lady Patriota best James Clemens again to win Area 8 crown

Harvest

Triana chosen for Smithsonian’s ‘Crossroads: Change in Rural America’ exhibit

Bob Jones High School

Madison Street Festival grants reach $20K for 35 school projects

Harvest

Senior center members launch Arise2Read at Harvest elementary

Madison

MVP to promote Monarch butterfly survival with mural, contests

x