• 70°

Remembering Sept. 11

By Staff
From a young person's point of view
By Thomas Tingle
Record Managing Editor
Today is the first year anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York City, Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania.
As we remember the thousands of lives lost on that tragic day, we've asked students from Madison's eight city schools to put in writing their thoughts of this day of remembrance. We have students from the elementary, middle and high school levels that have shared their comments in a small essay written in their own words.
A specific length was not assigned knowing that the essays would vary in size. We appreciate all of the cooperation from our city schools in arranging to have the students do this for this publication and we thank the parents for allowing their children to do this.
Remembering Sept. 11
Hannah Fisher, Heritage Elementary School
"I remembered the planes crashed into the buildings and thousands of people died. Everyone was so sad because their children could have died too. I am still sad that happened. Everyone wants to bless America more."
Remembering Sept. 11
Baylee Driggers, Rainbow Elementary School
"It was very sad that many people died on Sept. 11. It was good that the mean guys died. It was a shame that many people died. I hope that it will never happen again.
I think that Sept. 11 should be a holiday so we will never forget those people. God Bless America.
Remembering Sept. 11
Anthony Ngo – Madison Elementary School
I am very sad that all the people have lost their lives that day and people losing moms, dads, husbands and wives.
I wish the plane didn't crash into the World Trade Center. I feel sorry for the ones who have lost their family members. If there was more peace in the world, the plane probably wouldn't have crashed into the World Trade Center.
I pray there will be no more planes crashing into any buildings. I wish that Osama Bin Laden was in jail right now. If he were in jail before the planes crashed there wouldn't be any plane crashing. I know how it feels to lose a family member. If I lost a family member I would be very sad.
I wish no one would try to kill another person. I wish that everyone would just be friends with each other. I do not want anyone to try to kill people anymore.
Remembering Sept. 11
Rob Jenkins – Horizon Elementary School
Sept. 11 means a great deal to me. That day in school I learned of the tragedy and I was frightened.
My first thought was my dad works for Boeing. What if they go there next? I am sad for all of the people who died that day. To me, 9/11 is one of America's great victories to show we can be stronger if we all pull together like we did then. All Americans can still help the people that were effected by that day. I think if Bin Laden attacked us again, we would be ready for it.
Remembering Sept. 11
Wayne You – Horizon Elementary School
I felt sorrow for those whose loved ones died in the attack on the World Trade Center on 9/11/01. I think Osama Bin Laden is a threat to America. The people who saved others are heroes. I also felt sad because the U.S. economy had a great downfall.
In May 2001, I visited New York with my family. I had not expected this would happen. The World Trade Center is a very happy source of economy. I felt joy when I saw it the, but now the place is filled with sorrow. I wish they didn't destroy the trade center. About 3,000 deaths are Osama's fault.
Remembering Sept. 11
Ranya Zahran, West Madison Elementary School
Sept. 11 started as any other day. No one knew what was going to take place that day.
It was another normal day, people went to work, went to school, and all was OK.
Suddenly, things started to look really sad. In just minutes, airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. My friends and I were very scared when we heard that terrorists are behind this criminal act. I was really sad how that day turned out to be, what started out as a normal day, became the day that changed our lives and the whole world.
Few days after that day, I didn't feel like going to school, or leaving the house. I just wanted to stay home with mom and dad where I felt safe. Now when I think of Sept. 11, I am still sad that it happened. I am sad for all the innocent people killed that day, but what's new is that I feel stronger, much stronger than before. I am not scared anymore.
America is very strong. I listen to our president and he says the same thing my mom and dad tell me about being strong and having faith. We are a strong nation and we will defeat evil, no doubt in my mind. God Bless America.
Remembering Sept. 11
Aaron Sherrill, West Madison Elementary School
The first thing that runs through my mind when I think about Sept. 11 is what a tragic day it was.
It's hard to believe that a year has gone by since the terrorism attack on the twin towers and the Pentagon. Although I'm sure it seems longer for the people that have lost someone special to them or people who were a witness to it all.
When it was heard on the news that the twin towers had been hit, it felt like our country was less safe, but also at the same time our country became strong than before the attack occurred. The people showed that they were stronger by giving support and donations to those who need it. Although the terrorists meant to tear our country apart, they in fact made us more united and determined to do something about the terrorism.
I am thankful to be an American because of the rights and freedoms we have that most the other countries don't have. The strength that the U.S. continues to show will make sure no more terrorist attacks like Sept. 11 will ever happen again in this country. I also know that our military will fight for our country and never give up on the fight against terrorism or any other threat to our nation. The people who died in the attack or sacrificed their lives because of it will always be remembered.
When thinking about all of this, I hope that we can come together today and turn this anniversary of an attack into a reflection of how great a country we are.
Seventh Grade –
Eighth Grade –
Remembering Sept. 11
Sarah Grogan, Liberty Middle School
"It seems like yesterday when I heard the news, and in fifth period class, my emotions I did lose.
I cried for the first time in three or four years worried and scared through the strong flowing tears. I was scared for his safety, my dad that I love, as I sat there in fear, I prayed to God above. Sept. 11 is a day our hearts will know forever, which some want to forget, others relive, or think of never.
Thousands were killed and many more hurt, others helped search through the rubble and dirt. Even though our buildings won't stand, God still has the world in the palm of His hand. Our country is united and it will not fall, our people stand together, strong, bold, and tall. No one can take away our passion or pride, and just for that, so many heroes have died.
They died for a reason, and they died not in vain. They suffered and died so we would not have pain. We may get pushed, but we will not fall down, not our country, a city, or a little small town. They may think that over us they tower, but America is still the strongest power.
So let's not live in fear, as we walk down the street, be thankful for your life and the people you meet. Don't take those that you hold dear for granted, tell them you love them and they won't forget it."
Remembering Sept. 11
Tara Wood – Bob Jones High School
Sept. 11, a day of horror, the day that changed the world (not to mention the New York skyline).
I have heard many things about that infamous day, many accusations. Most people do not remember it for what it means. Like all good Americans, we see a tragedy and find ways to capitalize on it.
Sept. 11 does not represent the American people getting rich. It represents the hate one group of people has for us, and the depravity of one man who has the personality of a spoiled little rich kid. This is what Sept. 11 means to me.
This day has changed my life, not only because of the numerous school projects and television ads that were spawned from the burning rubble of the towers, but it has affected many people who are close to me.
A lot of my friends knew people that died on that fateful day, and some of my peers have been confronted simply because of their religion. Sept. 11 brought out the worst in people. The tragedy of Sept. 11, the lives lost, is horrible to remember, but worse is the effect it has had on our nation.
People are afraid, and they hate the people that brought it about, but they take out their anger and fear on the innocent.
Sept. 11 will always be the day that the twin towers, and the many innocent people, died, but it will also represent the injustice in the days that followed.
Remembering Sept. 11
Taryn Callahan – Bob Jones High School
Sept. 11 means many things to me. It used to be a special day to me because it is my birthday, but now more importantly, it is a day of remembrance.
It also means a fear of more terrorist attacks and people I love getting hurt. It is a day of mourning for the many people who lost their lives and a day to comfort people who lost loved ones. Finally, Sept. 11 shows that weaker countries can bring down even the mightiest ones.
My life was affected greatly because of Sept. 11. I have family in New York City, one of who worked in the twin towers, but was lucky enough to not be there when the attacks happened. I also have friends in Washington, D.C. and was afraid that someone I knew might have gotten hurt.
My dad's work is also more secure now so it is harder to visit him and there are military men stationed outside with guns. Plus, I have become closer to my friends and family and talk to them more often.
There have been many changes in the United States since Sept. 11. Security at military bases and other important places has been heightened. One other places in particular where security has elevated is an airport. People in this country have also become less open to immigrants, especially ones from the Middle East. In conclusion, the country has become stronger since the attacks and have pulled together to support each other despite their differences.
Remembering Sept. 11
Zeenia Ansari – Bob Jones High School
To me, Sept. 11 was a tremendous jolt for all of America.
It was a day that changed the way that everyone looked at everyone else. People started classifying other people into certain groups, such as "the terrorist type" and the "non-terrorist type."
The terrorist attacks were a reality slap for me personally as well. To understand this you will have to know a little more about me.
I am a sophomore at Bob Jones High School and I am Muslim. I wear a scarf on my head and do not expose my body.
This religious act of covering is called hijab. When I first heard news of the terrorist attacks, I was a freshman. When my teacher turned on the television to the news, I could not see anything because I was all the way in the back of the classroom. I do remember seeing the looks of shock on all my classmates' faces.
Everyone was staring blankly at the screen. I couldn't understand what was going on. When I finally got a closer look at the television screen, I realized what had happened. A plane had crashed into the World Trade Center. For a while I just couldn't process it in my head.
I remember asking myself how something this terrible could possibly happen. Then when I looked back at the screen, I saw footage of Muslims and a picture of Osama Bin Laden. At that moment, I knew what was going through almost everyone's mind – the Muslim's did it. I went from class to class.
Students were staring at my scarf in the hallways and continuously asking questions throughout the day. Millions of things were rushing through my head at one time, so I just couldn't think straight. I just kept trying to defend my religion. I didn't want anyone to get the wrong idea about Islam, although some people did anyway. I knew that this one-day would change the rest of my life.
Since that demoralizing day people have looked at me very differently. I got stares and whispers. Someone even accused me of carrying a bomb with me. People were scared of me. They thought it was part of my religion to terrorize and kill, though the truth is completely opposite of this.
Islam is a religion of peace and not hatred. I think that ignorance has blinded some people from seeing this.
I believe that the fact that I was born in Pakistan and not in the United States and also the fact that I am Muslim do not make me less of an American. The terrorist attacks were as devastating to me as they were to anyone else living in the United States I believe that what the terrorists did was malevolent and inhuman.
I just wish that people would be more open minded towards Islam and stop thinking of Muslims as terrorist.
Personally, I don't think that religion should have even been an issue with the terrorist attacks.
This does not mean that everyone that follows that religion is a terrorist. I hope that on this anniversary, Americans can stop trying to classify select people as terrorists and try to do more for their country. We must all try to cover up the scar that the terrorists left on the face of America. We must show them that despite their efforts to destroy our country, America still stands tall.

Madison

Young artists can submit artwork that will be launched into space

Events

Toyota Field to host Artemis I splashdown party on Sunday

Bob Jones High School

Bob Jones to represent Alabama at Southeastern Theatre Conference

Business

The State Of The Rocket City Trash Pandas 2022

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Rocket City Marathon 2022: New Format, New Course, New Day

James Clemens High School

Christmas Card Lane brightens downtown streets

Liberty Middle School

World War II, Korea veteran Walt Siffringer accepts Quilt of Valor

Bob Jones High School

beEntrepreneurial [beE] High School Idea Competition sets Dec. 7 deadline

Madison

School board approves bid to turn the old West Madison campus into PreK Center

Bob Jones High School

Greenpower racing builds STEM skills and confidence

Madison

Madison Animal Rescue Foundation in need of new foster homes

Madison

How to submit your child’s “Letter to Santa”

Events

Neighbors: Community theater groups in Decatur to stage ‘ELF: The Musical’

Events

Driving Nights for Galaxy of Lights begin today at Huntsville Botanical Garden

Events

Polar Express Christmas Tree Trail lighting and Wassail Fest being held Friday in downtown Madison

Bob Jones High School

Former Patriot named assistant director of coaching at North Alabama SC

Digital Version

Check out the new issue of Madison Living Magazine

James Clemens High School

James Clemens medical and drama students, first responders simulate trauma scene

Madison

Curbside recycling recovery assistance throughout the weekend

Bob Jones High School

Scholarships at stake in American Legion oratorical contest

Bob Jones High School

Nichols’ podcast avers multi-disciplines feed theatre

Business

Town Madison becomes city’s first Arts & Entertainment District

Events

Asbury Church to present “Lessons & Carols: The Songs of Christmas” on Dec. 4

Events

Christmas at Burritt on the Mountain

x